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Course Listing for: Physician / View All

A complete listing of currently available online programs is provided below. To access the program materials click the appropriate format available button (View PDF) (View Webcast), provided with each program listing.

To earn CE/CME credits you must review a program in its entirety and have successfully completed the course online post-exam. Online exams provide an immediate grade report along with a Letter of Completion. All Letters of Completion become a permanent part of your Notonemorelife.org Professional Education User Record and may be accessed anytime in the future for viewing and printing by logging back into the professional education section of this website.

*  Allergy and Asthma In Children
* Allergy and Asthma In Children
Effective Date: 6/1/2014
Expiration Date: 6/1/2016
Credits: 0.5
Faculty:
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Michael L. LeNoir, MD, FAAP, FAAAI

Associate Clinical Professor in Pediatrics at the University of California
President Elect, National Medical Association
CEO of the Ethnic Health America Network
Director of the Bay Area Multicultural Clinical Research and Prevention Center
President of the Ethnic Health Institute at Summit Medical Center
Chair of the Allergy & Asthma initiative
Alta Bates Summit Medical Center
Clear the Air Allergy and Asthma Committee of the National Medical Association

Dr. LeNoir is a Board Certified Pediatrician with a subspecialty in Allergy. Dr. LeNoir is an Associate Clinical Professor in Pediatrics at the University of California.. He is a nationally recognized expert in asthma in urban inner cities. Dr. LeNoir has been in practice for the past 20 years.

Description:

This program focuses on the links between atopy, specifically allergic rhinitis and childhood asthma.  The goal is to enhance the ability of primary care providers (PCPs) to identify patients with allergic conditions that are associated with asthma.

Original Release Date: 10/01/2012     Review Date: 06/01/2014

* Missing In Action: Missing the Diagnosis of Asthma
* Missing In Action: Missing the Diagnosis of Asthma
Effective Date: 6/1/2014
Expiration Date: 6/1/2016
Credits: 1
Faculty:
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Cheryl Doyle, MD

Board Certified Pediatric Pulmonologist
Board Certified Integrative and Holistic Medicine
Pediatric Pulmonology Practice, PC
Brooklyn, New York

Cheryl Doyle, M.D. is a pediatric pulmonologist in solo practice in Brooklyn, New York. Her undergraduate degree was conferred by Manhattanville College in Purchase, New York. She received her medical degree from SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn, New York. Her pediatric residency, including a chief residency was completed at the Harlem Hospital in New York City. Dr. Doyle continued her training as a clinical fellow in pediatric pulmonology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, New York. After completing her fellowship, Dr. Doyle became the Director of the Pediatric Special Care Unit, and the Assistant Director of the Cystic Fibrosis Center at the Long Island College Hospital. Soon after, she became an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Pediatrics at SUNY Downstate Medical Center. Thereafter, Dr. Doyle served as an Associate Director in the Department of Pediatrics at the Woodhull Medical Center in Brooklyn. She convened two pediatric pulmonary clinics and participated in the Asthma Task Force of the New York City Health & Hospital Corporation. Adding to her board certification in Pediatrics and Pediatric Pulmonology, Dr. Doyle is certified by the American Board of Integrative and Holistic Medicine. Now in private practice, Dr. Doyle is particularly focused on the control of asthma in the inner city combining a holistic perspective with an emphasis on nutrition.

Description:

Asthma in the United States continues to be characterized by alarmingly persistent, if not increasing, healthcare disparities. Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reviewed asthma prevalence, disease characteristics and self-management education in the United States over the period of 2001 – 2009. The overall prevalence of asthma increased 12.3% from 7.3% (20.3 million persons) in 2001 to 8.2% (24.6 million persons) in 2009. This increase in prevalence was most notable among the young, minorities, women and the poor. Persistent disparities in prevalence, healthcare utilization and morbidity attributable to asthma continue to increase primarily among minority and poor populations. This case study describes the challenges associated with caring for disparate populations while discussing strategies to overcome barriers to care, achieve control, and improve outcomes in asthmatic patients.

Original Release Date: 10/16/2011     Review Date: 06/01/2014

* Severe Asthma: Bridging the Gaps in Practice
* Severe Asthma: Bridging the Gaps in Practice
Effective Date: 6/1/2014
Expiration Date: 6/1/2016
Credits: 1
Faculty:
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W. Gerald Teague, MD

Professor of Pediatrics,
Director, Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergy,
University of Virginia School of Medicine,
Charlottesville, VA

Clinical Practice: Pediatric Respiratory Medicine, Severe Asthma, Chronic cough, GERD, Respiratory diseases.

Research Interests: Asthma, Clinical trials in Asthma, Airways pH regulation, Lung no biology, Airways Redox Chemistry, Formation of breath condensate, Inflammatory response to air pollution, Human rhinovirus infection and asthma, GERD and Asthma

Description:

This module will focus on current guidelines and best evidence as they relate to the diagnosis and management of severe asthma. The goal is to enhance the ability of primary care providers (PCPs) to identify patients with poor asthma control, work through remediable factors, and diagnose those with true, treatment-refractory severe asthma. In this way clinical outcomes will be optimized when possible for this high-risk group of patients.

Original Release Date: 05/20/2012     Review Date: 06/01/2014

* The Role of Community Outreach and Community Resources
* The Role of Community Outreach and Community Resources
Effective Date: 6/1/2014
Expiration Date: 6/1/2016
Credits: 1
Faculty:
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Ann-Marie Brooks, MD, FAAP

Georgia Pediatric Pulmonary Associates, PC
Medical Director of the Children’s Asthma Center
Atlanta, Georgia

Dr. Ann-Marie Brooks earned her undergraduate degree from Brown University. In 1992, she completed her medical school training at Cornell University School of Medicine and followed that with the completion of her pediatric residency and chief residency at the University of Rochester-Strong Memorial Hospital. Dr. Brooks stayed at the University of Rochester to complete a unique, dual fellowship program in pediatric pulmonology and general academic pediatrics. This program allowed her to incorporate graduate studies in Public Health and Epidemiology into the standard general pediatrics and pulmonology curriculum. She is board certified in pediatric pulmonology.

Dr. Brooks moved to Orlando, Fl in 1999 and accepted a combined research and clinical position with The Nemours Foundation and Children’s Clinic. She served as clinical instructor for the pediatric residency program at Arnold Palmer Children’s Hospital and pursued several community based research projects in the area. She was a founding member and Vice-President, of the Central Florida Asthma Consortium and worked with the Community Health Improvement Council of Central Florida to institute a community-based childhood asthma management program. Dr. Brooks moved with her family to South Carolina in 2001 where she continued to serve as medical director for this program and raise 3 small children. In 2004 she served as Assistant Professor at Medical University of South Carolina. She joined Georgia Pediatric Pulmonology Associates in March 2006.

Dr. Brooks is skilled in all areas of pediatric pulmonology including bronchoscopy. She has particular interest in early childhood asthma, chronic lung disease of prematurity and the pulmonary sequelae of muscular disorders.

Board certified in pediatric pulmonology, Dr. Brooks is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics, and a member of the American Thoracic Society and National Medical Association.

Description:

This activity will review the role of the community in contributing to asthma morbidity and as a possible avenue for reducing disease burden and existing disparities. The history and lessons learned from large, national community-based efforts will be reviewed and practical methods to build and initiate coalitions and outreach efforts will be discussed.

Original Release Date: 4/15/2012     Review Date: 06/01/2014

* The Role of Lung Function in Primary Care Assessment of Asthma
* The Role of Lung Function in Primary Care Assessment of Asthma
Effective Date: 6/1/2014
Expiration Date: 6/1/2016
Credits: 1
Faculty:
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Nemr S. Eid, MD

Nemr S. Eid, MD, is Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in Kentucky. He is also Director of Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Director of the Cystic Fibrosis Center at Kosair Children’s Hospital in Louisville. Kosair Children’s Hospital has been nationally ranked by U.S. News & World Report for treating Respiratory Disorders three years in row 2009-2012.
Dr. Eid received his medical degree from the University of Liege in Belgium. He then completed a residency in pediatrics at the Health Sciences Center of the State University of New York in Brooklyn, where he also completed a fellowship in pediatric pulmonary medicine and intensive care medicine.
As an expert in pediatric pulmonary medicine, especially childhood asthma, cystic fibrosis, and infantile wheezing, Dr. Eid serves as a reviewer for a number of leading pediatric and pulmonary journals. He also serves as a consultant to major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies who develop respiratory products. He has presented his research at numerous national and international meetings and has authored 137 journal articles, reviews, book chapters, and abstracts. Dr. Eid has served as Chairman and a faculty member of many national educational initiatives relating to childhood asthma and cystic fibrosis
Dr. Eid is certified by the American Board of Pediatrics, with subspecialty certification in pediatric pulmonology. He is affiliated with a number of national and international professional organizations, including the American Thoracic Society, where he serves as advisory member of the Society’s Clinical Practice Committee, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Chest Physicians. He has been the recipient of many patient care awards, including the 1997 “Irving H. Shaw Distinguished Service Award” from the Kentucky Association of Health Underwriters. He has been listed in Best Doctors in American from 2003-2011, and received the 2011 and 2012 Patients’ Choice Award.

Description:

This module will focus on the guidelines as they relate to the role of lung function in the diagnosis and management of asthma. The goal is to enhance the ability of primary care providers (PCPs) s to diagnose and manage patients with asthma, thus improving clinical outcomes for each patient.

Original Release Date: 4/20/2012     Review Date: 06/01/2014

Addressing Asthma Disparities in Inner City and Minority Populations
Addressing Asthma Disparities in Inner City and Minority Populations
Effective Date: 4/27/2012
Expiration Date: 4/1/2013
Credits:
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LeRoy M. Graham, Jr, MD, FCCP

Georgia Pediatric Pulmonology Associates, PC
Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Morehouse School of Medicine
Founder and Medical Director Not One More Life, Inc

LeRoy M. Graham, Jr., MD, FCCP is Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at Morehouse School of Medicine and Staff Physician at Scottish Rite Children’s Medical Center, Hughes Spalding Children’s Hospital, and Egleston Children’s Hospital, all located in Atlanta, Georgia. He is also one of the partners of Georgia Pediatric Pulmonology Associates, PC, a private practice in Atlanta, Georgia. He is also founder and Medical Director of Not One More Life Asthma, Inc. He received his medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC. Dr. Graham completed his internship and residency in pediatrics at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center in Aurora, Colorado, and he completed a fellowship in pediatric pulmonology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, Colorado. In addition, he completed a fellowship in pulmonary research at the Cardiovascular Pulmonary Research Laboratory of the Webb Waring Lung Institute in Denver. Dr. Graham serves on the Board of Regents of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) and on the AACP’s Diversity Task Force commissioned to address health disparities attributable to respiratory disease; he also serves as chair of the Task Force’s subcommittee on education and research.

Dr. Graham has published numerous articles and abstracts in Chest, Journal of the Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, American Review of Respiratory Disease, Pediatrics and Journal of the American Medical Association.

Description:

Despite 3 iterations of the NAEPP Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma, disparities in the prevalence, morbidity and mortality of Asthma remain alarmingly persistent among certain populations. Healthcare providers must be aware of these disparities in the populations they serve. Moreover, providers must understand current insights into potential causes of these disparities and the related implications for effective provider, patient and community based education and management to reduce and ultimately eliminate these disparities.

Allergy Considerations in Asthma Management: A Case Based Discussion
Allergy Considerations in Asthma Management: A Case Based Discussion
Article with Discussion Board
Effective Date:
Expiration Date:
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Jon E. Stahlman, MD

Dr. Jon E. Stahlman, an Atlanta native, received his B.S. and M.D. degrees at Emory University. He subsequently completed his pediatric residency at Children's Hospital in Boston and his fellowship in Allergy and Clinical Immunology at Harvard University's Children's Hospital/Brigham and Woman's Hospital. After his training, Dr. Stahlman completed two years of clinical research at Boston Children's Hospital. His research interest included steroid dependent asthma as well as the use of computerized monitoring of lung function.

Dr. Stahlman is Board Certified in Allergy and Clinical Immunology and Pediatrics. He also became a Certified Clinical Research Investigator in 2003. Dr. Stahlman and his family moved to Atlanta to join Dr. Robert Cohen at The Allergy & Asthma Center, L.L.C. in 2001 after finishing his allergy training and working as an allergist in Massachusettes.

Description:

Case review article with participant discussion board. Joh E. Stahlman, MD presents this article.

Asthma is a respiratory disease with both strong genetic and environmental influences. It is important for health care providers to recognize the role that atopy (allergies) play in the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of asthma in children and adults.

Developing a High-Risk Asthma Protocol: A Case Based Discussion
Developing a High-Risk Asthma Protocol: A Case Based Discussion
Article with Discussion Board
Effective Date: 4/1/2012
Expiration Date:
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Renee Bomar, NP

Renee Bomar earned her undergraduate bachelor of science in nursing at the Medical College of Georgia. After working as a staff nurse at Grady Hospital and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta – Scottish Rite for three years, Renee returned to graduate school and completed her masters of nursing and pediatric nurse practitioner certification program at Emory University. She joined Georgia Pediatric Pulmonology Associates in 1989.

Renee enjoys participating in the care of children with a variety of pulmonary disorders and has a special interest in patient education and the care of premature babies.

In addition to limited clinical responsibilities, Renee is also the Director of Clinical Operations responsible for clinical staff management, marketing and program development and serves as our key-user for our electronic medical records system.

Renee is an allied health member of American College of Chest Physicians. She has privileges at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta: Scottish Rite.

Description:

Case review article with participant discussion board. Renee Bomar, NP presents this article.

Asthma can have a significant impact on a patient’s quality of life. The development of a comprehensive High-Risk Asthma Program can alleviate this impact by allowing targeted interventions designed to improve control and reduce the patient’s risk of adverse asthma outcomes and mortality.

Effective Management Of Asthma By Primary Care Providers
Format:   Webcast
Effective Management Of Asthma By Primary Care Providers
Effective Date: 1/1/2013
Expiration Date: 12/31/2013
Credits: 1
Faculty:
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LeRoy M. Graham, Jr, MD, FCCP

Georgia Pediatric Pulmonology Associates, PC
Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics
Morehouse School of Medicine
Founder and Medical Director Not One More Life, Inc

LeRoy M. Graham, Jr., MD, FCCP is Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics at Morehouse School of Medicine and Staff Physician at Scottish Rite Children’s Medical Center, Hughes Spalding Children’s Hospital, and Egleston Children’s Hospital, all located in Atlanta, Georgia. He is also one of the partners of Georgia Pediatric Pulmonology Associates, PC, a private practice in Atlanta, Georgia. He is also founder and Medical Director of Not One More Life Asthma, Inc. He received his medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC. Dr. Graham completed his internship and residency in pediatrics at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center in Aurora, Colorado, and he completed a fellowship in pediatric pulmonology at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, Colorado. In addition, he completed a fellowship in pulmonary research at the Cardiovascular Pulmonary Research Laboratory of the Webb Waring Lung Institute in Denver. Dr. Graham serves on the Board of Regents of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) and on the AACP’s Diversity Task Force commissioned to address health disparities attributable to respiratory disease; he also serves as chair of the Task Force’s subcommittee on education and research.

Dr. Graham has published numerous articles and abstracts in Chest, Journal of the Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, American Review of Respiratory Disease, Pediatrics and Journal of the American Medical Association.

Description:

This program will discuss the pathophysiology of asthma and associated small airway inflammation, describe the relevance of small airway inflammation and implications for effective pharmacologic therapy, and review the current recommendations on the use of spirometry for the treatment of patients with asthma.

Upon completion of this program, attendees will be able to:

  1. Discuss the pathophysiology of asthma and associated small airway inflammation
  2. Describe the relevance of small airway inflammation to the exacerbation prone asthma phenotype and implications for effective pharmacologic therapy
  3. Review the current recommendations on the use of spirometry for the diagnosis, treatment, and assessment of control in asthma management
  4. Demonstrate improved knowledge, application, and interpretation of spirometry for the treatment of patients with asthma

IMPORTANT PROGRAM VIEWING INFORMATION: To participate in this program you must be registered and logged in to this website.

Is This Asthma? A Case Based Discussion
Is This Asthma? A Case Based Discussion
Article With Discussion Board
Effective Date: 10/1/2011
Expiration Date:
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Meshann FitzGerald, MD

Internal Medicine Physician

Dr. Meshann FitzGerald specializes in internal medicine, pulmonary disease and hospitalist.

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Johnson Haynes, Jr, MD, FCCP, FACP

University of South Alabama
Professor of Medicine Director,
USA Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine
Department of Medicine

Johnson Haynes, Jr., MD, FCCP is a Professor of Medicine at the University of South Alabama located in Mobile, Alabama. He received an academic scholarship to attend Tuskegee Institute where he majored in biology. He was the first recipient to receive the “Victor Benator Award for Excellence in Teaching by a Houseofficers”, and selected Chief Medical Resident in the Department of Internal Medicine while attending the University of South Alabama where he received his medical degree. He completed a Clinical Fellowship in Pulmonary Medicine at the University of South Alabama. As a National Research Service Award recipient, he journeyed to the University of Colorado as a Research Fellow in the Cardiovascular Pulmonary Research Laboratory. There his basic scientific interest in acute lung injury and mechanisms of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction were nurtured and have continued throughout his professional career. In 1988 he returned to the University of South Alabama as the first African-American faculty member in the Department of Internal Medicine where he currently practices as a Professor of Medicine and serves as Director of the University of South Alabama Comprehensive Sickle Cell Center and Assistant Dean of Diversity and Cultural Competence.

Dr. Haynes is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society, Who’s Who in the American Thoracic Society, and has been the recipient of America’s Top Doctor Award for twelve consecutive years, 2001-2012. He is a Fellow in the American College of Physicians and in the American College of Chest Physicians. He has authored over 43 peer-reviewed publications in major medical journals and 6 book chapters. He has been the recipient of several National Institutes of Health grants to study acute lung injury in sickle cell disease.

Description:

Case review article with participant discussion board. Meshann Fitzgerald, MD and Johnson Haynes, Jr, MD, FCCP, FACP present this article.

In recent years our understanding of asthma has changed. We no longer think of asthma as a collection of intermittent symptoms, but as a chronic syndrome. This shift in our point of reference has changed not only the way we treat the disease but also in how we approach the diagnosis of a patient with intermittent shortness of breath (SOB) and cough.

Note: CME Credit is not available for participation in this article.

Smoking Cessation: Our Knowing / Doing Gap
Smoking Cessation: Our Knowing / Doing Gap
Effective Date: 8/11/2012
Expiration Date: 8/10/2014
Credits:
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Varada Divgi, MD. D.CH, FAAP, CTTS

Associate Physician, Georgia Pediatric Pulmonology Associates, PC
Consultant, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
CEO, ToBeFREE Consulting

Dr. Varada Divgi is board certified in pediatrics and board eligible in Pediatric Pulmonology. She is a member of American Academy of Pediatrics including the Georgia chapter and American College of Chest Physicians. She has privileges at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.

Dr. Divgi is skilled in all areas of pediatric pulmonology, including bronchoscopy and sleep disorders in children. Her special interests are in prevention of the respiratory illnesses, mainly through tobacco prevention and improvement in nutrition of the children with respiratory diseases. She is a prominent member of the State of Georgia Tobacco Prevention Team.

Description:

Tobacco dependence is a chronic condition that affects both the body and the broader community. In this voice-over slides interactive course you will acquire knowledge to assess and manage tobacco dependence in patients at the primary care level.

Strategies for Improving Patient Provider Communication in Asthma: A Case Based Discussion
Strategies for Improving Patient Provider Communication in Asthma: A Case Based Discussion
Article with Discussion Board
Effective Date: 4/9/2012
Expiration Date: 4/9/2013
Credits:
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Randall Brown, MD, MPH

Adjunct Associate Professor, Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan and Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Pulmonology, Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University

Description:

Given the significant rise in US asthma prevalence across all age strata, it can be argued that this disease of inflammation is at least equally a disease of communication. Excellence in medical treatment is of no worth if the patient does not take the medication as prescribed. Clinician communication and patient education, therefore, are vital to a patient’s adherence with the clinician's recommendations. Studies consistently show that less than 50% of patients adhere to daily medication regimens. Furthermore, clinicians cannot predict better than chance which patients will be adherent. Adherence is not reliably associated with family income, parental education level, ethnicity, or race. Therefore, all patients require proper education communicated in a manner that builds self-confidence and enables adherence to the asthma treatment plan.1

Use of the Asthma Control Test (ACT) For Assessing Degree of Asthma Control: A Case Based Discussion
Use of the Asthma Control Test (ACT) For Assessing Degree of Asthma Control: A Case Based Discussion
Article with Discussion Board
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Gerald W. Staton, MD, FCCP

Professor of Medicine
Emory University School of Medicine
Atlanta, Georgia

Gerald W. Staton MD, FCCP, FACP is a Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia. He received a Bachelors of Chemistry degree from The Georgia Institute of Technology and his Medical degree from the Medical College of Georgia and was honored as the summa cum laude graduate of his class. Dr Staton’s internship and residency were completed at Stanford University and he was honored to be chosen for pulmonary fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital of Harvard University. He came to Emory in 1981 as an Instructor of Medicine, rising to Professor in 1993. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, and Critical Care Medicine.

Dr. Staton has previously published research relating to the diagnosis and immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases and the effects of off bypass coronary artery surgery on lung function. His current research interests are the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis.

Dr. Staton has been named one of the Best Pulmonary Physicians in Atlanta from 1995 up to the most recent listing in Atlanta Magazine and has been chosen one of the Best Doctors in America from 1995 to currently.

Description:

Case review article with participant discussion board. Gerald W. Staton, MD, FCCP presents this article.

The Asthma Control Test (ACT)i is a standardized and validated questionnaire that examines 5 aspects of the impact that asthma has on the patient: (1) effect on activities, work, school; (2) amount of shortness of breath; (3) nocturnal awakening with asthma; (4) use of rescue inhaler; and (5) overall asthma control. Each question can be scored by the patient on a 1-5 scale so that the worst score is 5 and the best score is 25. A score of 19 or less has been established to indicate less than optimal asthma control. This questionnaire can be filled out by the patient while waiting, and gives the care-giver a quick idea of the overall control of the asthma (like the measurement of the BP in a hypertensive patient).

The ACT is useful tool when assessing asthma control and guiding treatment. In patients that have perfect or almost perfect scores on repeated visits, attention can be given to stepping therapy down to a lower intensity. Patients with low scores should be evaluated to determine that asthma is the cause of the low score and then adjustments upward in treatment intensity should be made.